unexplained-events:

avathebelf:

thesylverlining:

unexplained-events:

A Tibetan Monk blesses the deer that gather around him and someone snaps a picture. Upon viewing the picture they notice a rainbow had appeared.

pretty sure this is the happiest picture I’ve seen in a long time

magic is real

I like how much this matters

unexplained-events:

avathebelf:

thesylverlining:

unexplained-events:

A Tibetan Monk blesses the deer that gather around him and someone snaps a picture. Upon viewing the picture they notice a rainbow had appeared.

pretty sure this is the happiest picture I’ve seen in a long time

magic is real

I like how much this matters

get to know me meme

5 favorite female characters [1/5] - aeryn sun

writersnoonereads:

No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’
Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook
update: illustrator Mahendra Singh says: “Joseph Péladan plays an occult role in Jean Christophe Valat’s Luminous Chaos (Melville House), the 2nd volume of his mind-bending, psychotropically overheated steampunk trilogy, Mysteries of New Venice. When I illustrated Sâr Péladan, I soon discovered the true meaning of ‘occult hair.’” Here it is!:

writersnoonereads:

No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’

Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

update: illustrator Mahendra Singh says: “Joseph Péladan plays an occult role in Jean Christophe Valat’s Luminous Chaos (Melville House), the 2nd volume of his mind-bending, psychotropically overheated steampunk trilogy, Mysteries of New Venice. When I illustrated Sâr Péladan, I soon discovered the true meaning of ‘occult hair.’” Here it is!:

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for silbern, just in time for easter !!

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for silbern, just in time for easter !!

forgottenwinterfrost:

aelx:

ipoog:

daily reminder to click a button so you can give free food to a shelter!!

image

if every one of my followers did this, we could give more than 85 meals to less-fortunate animals. for free.

AH HHA ITS BACK YES PLEASE IT TAKES A SECOND OF YOUR TIME AND A LIFE OF AN ANIMAL

huskdawgzilla:

you’re hired

huskdawgzilla:

you’re hired

Kitty for your dashboard

Kitty for your dashboard

The Druk (Dzongkha: འབྲུག་) is the “Thunder Dragon” of Bhutanese mythology and a Bhutanese national symbol. A druk appears on the Bhutanese flag, holding jewels to represent wealth. In the Dzongkha language, Bhutan is called Druk Yul, or Land of Druk, and Bhutanese leaders are called Druk Gyalpo, Dragon Kings. During the Bhutanese mock election in 2007, all four mock parties were called the Druk colour Party.[1] The national anthem of Bhutan, Druk tsendhen, translates into English as “The Kingdom of Druk”.
Just look at this Wikipedia entry on how much Bhutan loves its dragon. (via beautifuljustbeautiful)